Glosna House Support Centre

'Glosna' translates to fertile place'  

Family Therapy


Family therapy can help you improve troubled relationships with your partner, children or other family members. You may address specific issues such as marital or financial problems, conflict between parents and children, or the impact of substance abuse or a mental illness on the entire family. Family therapy can be useful in any family situation that causes stress, grief, anger or conflict. It can help you and your family members understand one another better and learn coping skills to bring you closer together.


The aim of Family Therapy is to enable family members to express and explore difficult thoughts and feelings safely, understand each other’s experience and opinions in relation to current problems in the family and hence appreciate each other’s needs. A family therapist supports the family in finding constructive ways to help each other and build on family strength so that changes can take place in the family. It not only supports changes with individuals but also affects their relationships within the family and beyond.


Caroline Shore - Training Family Therapist


Caroline is in her third year of a Masters in Family Therapy at UCD. Since graduating with a Degree in Social Studies from Trinity College in 2007, she has worked with children, adolescents and their families in a variety of areas including mental health and disabilities. 


Caroline works with family members who are interested in reflecting on their relationships with each other and how these may be influencing their current difficulties or concerns. She seeks to understand the perspectives of each person and to explore how their past and current relationships, may be influencing their communication and behavioural patterns. 


Caroline works with clients to understand the changes they would like to make and supports them in working towards these changes. She is sensitive to diverse family forms, beliefs and cultures and to enabling people to talk, together or individually, often about difficult or distressing issues, in ways that support recovery.